Flower Care

Learn how to take care of fresh cut flowers- hydrating, cutting, pruning, and more.

Fresh-Cut-Hydrangeas

Taking care of fresh cut flowers is a lot like taking care of a pet – to make sure they live the longest, happiest life possible, you have to give them water, feed them, and pet them. Just kidding about the last one, but giving your DIY blooms love and the right amount of attention is crucial for ensuring they look stunning on your big day! How you care for your flowers directly affects their “vase life,” or how long they last after you receive them. Properly caring for flowers isn’t as hard as it seems, but we’ll show you how to do flower care right – and the wrong way to do it, too!

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Tips for Hydrating, Arranging, and Beyond! from the Blooms by the Box Pros

Creating your own arrangements for your DIY event can seem like a daunting task, and we completely understand why! For most people, this will be the first time they arrange their own flowers – and the last time they do it on such a large scale. No need to worry, though! We’ve got some tips that will make this process a lot less intimidating. From hydrating your flowers after you receive them, to getting you beautiful handmade arrangements to your venue, we’re here for you with expert tips every step of the way!

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One of the questions we get asked most often is, “What do I do with my roses after they’re delivered?” Don’t panic! The process of re-hydrating and caring for your wholesale flowers (i.e. making sure you don’t ruin them before your DIY event) is actually really simple. We’ve broken down the steps for caring for your roses to ensure they’re looking their best for the big day!

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Part 3 of Blooms Blog’s “What Types of Flowers Should I Use for My Wedding” Series: The Best DIY Wedding Flowers

We’re back with another important question when deciding what types of flowers to choose for your wedding:  What types of flowers are DIY friendly? Even if you’re experienced at arranging flowers or creating bouquets, some flower varieties are just easier to work with than others.  Some are hardy, some fragile; some last for weeks while others just for days.   Some need very little preparation to arrange, others require a little special care and handling to reach peak condition and be used in bouquets and arrangements.  Here are some tips for picking the best DIY wedding flowers for your bouquets and centerpieces.

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How many petals do I need?


Posted By on Apr 2, 2015

*****The winner of The Petal Count Challenge is announced at the end of this post*****

How many petals do I need for my wedding? There is a wide variety of ways you can use flower petals for your wedding. Some of the most common uses for petals is making  a trail down the aisle, filling a flower girl basket, or scattering petals across a table.
Freeze dried petals are pretty amazing. These beauties have quite the reputation. One of our favorite things about them is they can last up to a year! They are wonderfully fragrant, they do not wilt, they do not crumble, and they’re gorgeous. Freeze dried petals are also not limited to just roses, but we have different blends of lilac, peony, and hydrangea petals.

As you may know, The Petal Count Challenge ended on Tuesday. We wanted to help you better answer the question, how many petals do I need? So, in this challenge you had to guess the number of petals seen in the photo below. And, drum roll please…

how many flower petals do i need 800b

There were 3,351 petals in this photo! And yes, we counted every last one of them. This heart 43in wide and 32in tall. And we used a full two of the Assorted Pastel Blend FD Rose Petals. The petals come in quantities of 30 cups, so here we had about 60 cups. These very popular premium freeze dried rose petals are a blend of pastel ivory, peach, pinks, and apricot- perfect for spring time!

Check out the photos below and get to know these freeze dried petals a little better.

how many petals do i need scatter 800b
Here are about 2 cups/handfuls of petals scattered across a square yard.

how many petals do i need aisle
Here are 60 cups scattered more dense (about 1.5 yards wide and 4 yards long).

how many petals do i need flower girl baskeHere is a medium sized flower girl basket with 3 handfuls/cups filling it.

how many petals do i need bag
Here is 1 handful/cup in a corsage bag. These bags are perfect for giving to guest to toss in the air.

See our freeze dried petal FAQ if you have more questions! Or contact us and we can help you out.

Now, the moment we’ve all been waiting for. We have a winner to announce! This person properly entered the contest by liking our Facebook page, sharing The Petal Challenge post, and commenting her guess. We are so impressed, our winner came only 4 petals shy of the correct total. That’s right, 4 petals.  A huge congratulations to

BROOKE LEDFORD

You are the winner of The Petal Count Challenge and recipient of a $50 Blooms By The Box gift card!

petal count challenge thank you

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A Guide to Using Baby’s Breath in Bouquets, Wedding Flowers and Arrangements

“How much baby’s breath do I need?” This is a question we hear a lot. This is also a question that is very difficult to answer. Baby’s breath (Gypsophilia) can be used for so many different kinds of floral arrangements- mason jar centerpieces, pew arrangements, flower crowns, bouquets, bad vases, boutonnieres, etc. It’s a filler that goes a long way. Each bunch comes with around 10 stems. To better understand how much baby’s breath that really is, use these photos to give you an idea.

babys breath stem2This is ONE stem of baby’s breath. That’s right… one stem. Each stem will vary in shape and size, but all stems will have multiple smaller pieces branching out.

baby's breath scissorWe pruned the stem by cutting off each of the pieces that come off of the main stem.

baby's breath piece 1 baby's breath piece 4 baby's breath piece 3  And these are some of the pieces that were cut off from the main stem.

baby's breath piecesHere are all of the pieces that came from just that one stem.

baby's breath bunchAnd this is what it looks like when you bunch together all of those smaller pieces from the one stem.

Once the pieces from the one stem of baby’s breath is bunched together, you can see that a little goes a long way. That one stem could be enough for a mason jar centerpiece. If you want a more full arrangement, you will need 2 stems. For a full bouquet, 5-7 stems. A boutonniere will only take a fraction of a stem. Depending upon the head size, a flower crown will require between 4 and 6 stems.

We hope that helped and we’d love to answer any further questions! See our Baby’s Breath board on Pinterest for some awesome ways to use this filler.

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